Sausage Muffins

20120307-190954.jpg

Trying to persuade a picky eater to eat can sometimes be quite time-consuming and fruitless as I found out today. Yesterday I found a recipe on the Internet for Meatloaf Cupcakes I felt sure I was on to a winner. So today I went to Flitton Hill Farm Shop to buy as many of the ingredients as I could. Unfortunately for me they didn’t have any mince but they did have Breakheart Hill Farm sausage meat. This sausage meat is 75% meat and from pigs that have been reared on a free range farm in Bedfordshire.

20120307-192316.jpg

On returning home and looking at the recipe and what I had in my cupboard it was obvious I was going to have to be creative in order to produce the meal I had promised for dinner.

Here are the ingredients I used:

2 tbsp. of Griffin Farm extra virgin rapeseed oil
1/2 Chopped Onion
3 Grated Carrots
2 Garlic Cloves
325g of baby tomatoes
1 tbsp. white wine vinegar
1 tsp. sugar
500g Breakheart Hill Farm Sausage Meat
2 pieces of old bread for breadcrumbs
2 Large Breakheart Hill Farm Free Range eggs
Cooking spray
1 kg Flitton Hill Potatoes
5g of Butter
2 tbsp. of Milk
Bacon Bits to sprinkle on top

I put the oven on to pre-heat at 200 while I prepared the vegetables. I chopped the onion, peeled and grated the carrot and peeled the potatoes.

Then I added a tbsp. of Griffin Farm Rapeseed oil to a saucepan over a medium heat. When the oil had warmed I added the onions, the carrots and the garlic and sautéed until the onions where a light golden brown. I put to one side to cool.

Next I put the potatoes on raising the water temperature to boiling and then reducing to a simmer for 20 minutes.

Whilst the potatoes boiled I took two pieces of bread and with the hand blender reduced them to breadcrumbs.

As we didn’t have enough tomato ketchup in the fridge, and I didn’t have time to make homemade ketchup or to blanch and peel tomatoes, I made a vinegar tomato mix.

To do this I heated 1 tbsp. of Griffin Farm extra virgin rapeseed oil in a small saucepan, added the baby plum tomatoes and cooked into a pulp with the aid of a wooden spoon. I then added two tbsp. of white wine vinegar and one tsp. of sugar for sweetness and blended the contents of the pan until it was smooth.

Next I emptied the sausage meat, the carrot onions and garlic mix, the breadcrumbs, the vinegar tomato mix, and two beaten eggs into a large bowl and mixed together with a hand blender.

I then sprayed my cupcake holders with a light dusting of oil before filling them with the mixture and placing them on a baking tray and into the oven for 25 minutes.

I drained the potatoes which were now nice and soft when forked and left over the pan in a sieve for at least 5 minutes before returning them to the pan. I then added milk and butter and with my blender I made a buttery mash potato mix.

When the oven timer beeped, I removed the tray of sausage muffins from the oven, piped the mash as best as I could over the muffins, and sprinkled bacon bits on top.

As I am a recent convert to vegetarianism I confess I have no idea what the muffins tasted like but my husband and eldest daughter liked them. The two youngest being the pickiest failed to even try a fork full but raved about the left over mash. This was obviously not quite the response I had hoped for :-(

The Money Debate

I walked into the kitchen with my local meat. Organically reared beef from Croxton Park, St Neots I was feeling very proud of myself but unsure what the reaction at home would be as organic meat might be seen as unacceptably expensive compared to organic fruit and veg. As expected the question came “So how does that compare to the local supermarket?”

So I did the maths. I went to mysupermarket.co.uk and compared the prices across the stores. The supermarkets vary their store prices and receive a significant proportion of the price you pay with the farmer rumoured to receive a mere 9p of every pound spent. Today I am sorry to say the meat was more expensive at Flitton Hill Farm Shop. I am pleased though to say only by 1p which would easily be consumed in petrol when visiting the local supermarket.

Phew, I have that feel good factor again :-). In these harsh economic times, supporting our local businesses is crucial or else they will just disappear. Supporting local farmers who go the extra mile and provide us with organic food products is very much what I want to be doing.

Meat has now joined the honey, fruit and veg on my local food shopping list :-)

20120302-170021.jpg

But is meat good for you? That’s a question for another day?

Enjoyed this post? Why not leave a comment?

Lovefre.sh love Flitton Hill Farm Shop

We are really lucky to have an Organic Farm Shop very close to us. So expect to hear a lot about my visits to Flitton Hill Farm Shop.

Today during my visit to the shop I trialled the iPhone app Lovefre.sh . This is a social app with the goal to discovering local fresh food. The principle behind the app I love but none of my favourite local places had been marked on their map :-(. Which gave me a chance to use the app :-) .

I logged in and joined the service but you can check in at places anonymously basically you earn points when you check in. I am still not sure of the benefits of earning the points other than self gratification that you are sharing the discovery of fresh local food with others. The check in process is simple you just fill in a few fields describing the location and add a picture and a voice memo if you like. There are options for Facebook and twitter also. Other users can then love places which have been added to Lovefre.sh.

I will continue to add some of my favourite locations into Lovefre.sh. I am pleased to see Flitton Hill Farm shop marked now on their map even if I had to do it myself.

20120302-145928.jpg

Enjoyed this post? Why not leave a comment?