No more fizzy drinks for me.

20120306-163632.jpg

It’s been nagging at me for a while now. I remember my friends telling me a few years ago that it wasn’t good for me. I remember the reports way back in 2007 about the cancer risks of aspartame. I promised myself on New Year’s Eve that I was going to stop drinking it. I wonder what it is doing to my stomach if the kids use it to clean their coins with. Today I read a news report which yet again suggested that soft fizzy drinks are really not that good for you. This time the colouring was linked to cancer if you drank vast quantities. I wondered why I just didn’t give up today.

As I pondered on this I wondered how much of our weekly shopping bill went on fizzy drinks. Firstly I calculated the cost on a weekly basis and then on an annual basis. Then I calculated my share of the cost. I was quite frankly shocked by how much we were spending as a family on soft drinks. I drink quite a few cans a week so for me alone the cost was £300 annually. It seemed daft to me that although I don’t smoke and I rarely drink alcohol, I was still ready until today to spend £300 a year on something that most of us know is not healthy.

I have made the choice to finally put a stop to it and drink more water and now I need to encourage the family to stop by sharing the facts and figures with them.

When I was a child, fizzy drinks were occasional treats. I would like to see a move in that direction in our house for the benefits of our health and budgets.

The Money Debate

I walked into the kitchen with my local meat. Organically reared beef from Croxton Park, St Neots I was feeling very proud of myself but unsure what the reaction at home would be as organic meat might be seen as unacceptably expensive compared to organic fruit and veg. As expected the question came “So how does that compare to the local supermarket?”

So I did the maths. I went to mysupermarket.co.uk and compared the prices across the stores. The supermarkets vary their store prices and receive a significant proportion of the price you pay with the farmer rumoured to receive a mere 9p of every pound spent. Today I am sorry to say the meat was more expensive at Flitton Hill Farm Shop. I am pleased though to say only by 1p which would easily be consumed in petrol when visiting the local supermarket.

Phew, I have that feel good factor again :-). In these harsh economic times, supporting our local businesses is crucial or else they will just disappear. Supporting local farmers who go the extra mile and provide us with organic food products is very much what I want to be doing.

Meat has now joined the honey, fruit and veg on my local food shopping list :-)

20120302-170021.jpg

But is meat good for you? That’s a question for another day?

Enjoyed this post? Why not leave a comment?